Exercise 4

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Exercise 4

Post  Marlie E. Sisneros on Tue Mar 15, 2011 8:25 pm

noun--verb guideline
recommends that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder.

nouns
in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder.

verb
is the move operation.

File-moving
is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun--verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification.
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ASSIGNMENT 4

Post  rowellpines on Tue Mar 22, 2011 12:19 am



'The user, not the computer, begins and organizes all actions .'


I think these would be the best phrase that summarizes the TOPIC.

Noun by definition is the file to be moved and the destination folder. While the verb is the action that has been used for the process. Example would be the dialog box principles. A dialogue box can be utilized to designate when an error happens in the system. Once this error has been identified and presented to the user in the dialogue box, the only action that the system permits the user is to concede the error and discharge the dialogue box. The system blocks the user dialogue, with good explanation. The blocking nature of the dialogue box is to guarantee that the user really sees that there was an error.

..I think that was the far as I can say for now.
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Re: Exercise 4

Post  Sherwin_Elioreg on Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:02 pm

I really don't have any idea about what 'noun--verb' guideline for operations means. But according to my research...

The noun--verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation.


Source: http://www.hcibook.com/hcibook/exercises/chapt5.html

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  Calvin John Dalino on Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:20 pm

"The noun--verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun--verb--noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun--verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released. "

The bottom-line is computers cannot work without the presence of Human. Human plus computer can create a best relationship to provide best output.




http://www.hcibook.com/hcibook/exercises/chapt5.html


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Re: Exercise 4

Post  Michael Anthony Jandayan on Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:34 pm

As what I've read, the noun-verb guideline for Apple computers says that a desktop computer operation will always be composed of a noun (file) and a verb (the operation). An example would be copying a file to a new destination. The file being the noun and the copy operation being the verb. But there are some instances that this rule would be violated. Example is the the action to search for certain files in your computer system. First, you will not be selecting a file (noun) but rather type in a search dialogue box the search paramaters of the file you want to search. So, just from that point we can actually say that the noun-verb guideline is violated.

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Excercise 4

Post  Jake Darren T. Colina on Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:46 pm

Exercise 4 Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of action acting with one argument. In the case of moving a file (or copying for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user to first select the icon for the file to be moved and then indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released. The file moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is “move to destination folder.” Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialogue box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialogue is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialogue prescribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.(Taken in the internet this is the simple action of dragging and dropping things like in the desktop icons of what a user wants into his computer interface may look like another features of Human Computer Interaction much more on making ones side to his own things.)

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  padibergonia on Thu Apr 07, 2011 1:12 pm

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

a noun-verb guideline implies that the operations to be performed by the user are composed of an action which is the verb which acts with one argument which is the noun. Let us consider the case of moving or copying a file the action must have more than one argument. An example to this statement is to move files around on the Desktop. In this process before the move operation is performed the user must first select the icon for the file to be moved and then to choose the move operation by dragging the selected icon to where its destination folder is.


The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.
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Re: Exercise 4

Post  exzellrobelo on Thu Apr 07, 2011 1:16 pm

Answer:

To picture out this scenario, let us take as an example the transferring of files from one place to another or shall we say from this file folder to the other. In this case, the guideline tells us that the actions that are composed of an action and one argument, the user can view all the operations. The moving of files on the desktop requires the user first to select then click a certain file that is to be transferred to the destination folder. The verb in this situation is the move operation. It is important that the user would be familiar in manipulation. Other principle that we can apply to this is by just dragging the files to other location the same if we put it into actual.
To support this example, consistency can be observed and we can say that there is no violation in this guideline. The moving here is still consistent with respect to input expression. Better example is a command search to a file system to match in a certain specifications. Some of this operation is defined by a dialog box that indicates the search parameters. Once it is complete, then the system can perform the operation. This order of operation is more flexible for the user than consistent.

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  axel ros e. campaña on Thu Apr 07, 2011 1:27 pm


For me, based on what I had researched, there must be a pair of two entities called the noun - which serves as the object subject to be changed, moved, etc, and the verb, which specifies the action that must be completed to the object. A simple example of this is moving a file around the desktop. The noun is the file and the verb is the "cut" or "move to destination folder" command. So in that case, there are lots of cases that the above guidelines would be violated.
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JEanette R. Vale

Post  chamz_perez on Thu Apr 07, 2011 3:29 pm

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released. The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

reference: http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/
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Re: Exercise 4

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