Exercise 4

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Exercise 4

Post  Marybert V. Lee on Fri Mar 11, 2011 11:27 pm

4. Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)


The ‘noun-verb’ guideline for operations was actually a very frequent operation we do especially on our own computers. It merely address that in every operation in our working environment in our computer, there must be a specified object (file) in which an action (edit, delete, move, etc.) will be imposed upon. Yes, I agree that there can be an instance where this guideline be violated. I have read that the classic "Find" dialogue is actually a case of verb-noun structured modal design. One thing I noticed in Windows OS is that for instance you hit on the search button on your taskbar and you wanted to search for a specific file. But then, you hit on a misspelled filename. The search results into zero and you can’t find the file you needed. This guideline for operations needs accuracy with the keywords to be used for the object to be looked. Here, we can see that the operation wanted to achieve is to do the qualified search and the object is the set of folders or volumes of the system that is to be searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation such as some particular parameters for searching. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is alright for the system to perform the said operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is suppler for the user than dependable.



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Re: Exercise 4

Post  Mhel Sheryll Jala on Fri Mar 11, 2011 11:34 pm

Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.The file moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline because the verb is “move to destination folder.” Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialogue box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialogue is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialogue prescribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user .

http://www.hcibook.com/hcibook/downloads/pdf/exercises.pdf



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Re: Exercise 4

Post  Cariza Joy Ensoy on Fri Mar 11, 2011 11:40 pm

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

source:http://www.hcibook.com/hcibook/downloads/pdf/exercises.pdf

But trying to be honest with myself, i've already researched and looked for many resources that would explain this but it seems my comprehension is that poor because i don't understand anything.
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Exercise 4

Post  KatrinaAnirtak on Fri Mar 11, 2011 11:52 pm

Yep! The noun-verb guideline suggests that in every action executed within the computer by the user will perform as being composed. It is more easier if they build a new user interface that is comfortable with the user. And also, I haven't try using an Apple computer. (w/ sticker lang haha -ikoy's LT haha)That's all! Smile

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  Genne Fernandez on Sat Mar 12, 2011 1:02 am

the noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

Reference:
http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  willypedroso on Sat Mar 12, 2011 1:42 am

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)




In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released. The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

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Exercise 4

Post  kevin.cris.ramos on Sat Mar 12, 2011 7:16 am

A noun-verb guideline for operation is consist of a verb or an action and acting with one argument which is a noun. One of the examples that is applied around your desktop is moving a file. Which moving as a verb operation and nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The file-moving example is unnatural one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline. But still moving a file is still dependent prior to input expression because the verb is ‘move to destination folder’.

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  cherilyn lagare on Sat Mar 12, 2011 7:54 am

I am unaware about noun-verb guidelines, where in fact it's my first time to heard up the terms. i finally found out about this matter when I recently read a site pertaining to 'noun-verb' guideline.

The noun-verb guideline implies that user can perform a certain action (verb) and acting with one argument (noun) other abstract guidelines for the Desktop Interface is MOVING A FILE /FILE MOVING. Since the given hint talks about about moving files around on the Desktop.The action involves here is the move or copy which requires more than one argument. Moving a file is performed by the user to select first the icon for the file to be moved and to indicate the verb operation which is by dragging the selected icon to a file destination.

"The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched."

Reference:
http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/
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Re: Exercise 4

Post  jezrelle larubes on Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:37 am

Given that there are so many development takes place another in this generation, we can't deny the fact that there is inconsistency involved especially when it comes to execution that are made possible by the different ideas of technologies and its applications.

There are so many instances assist within the desktop of any person. Those moves and contacts done within the operation around the desktop will set the same as human-computer interaction. Moving files on the desktop also includes the instance of cutting and paste certain files and folders. The noun in the scenario is the files and folders to be cut and place to certain destination folder. The process requires the user to select the icon of the file which he wanted to cut and place to other destination and then the indication of the move operation implicitly done by clicking the mouse then select the cut function of the computer. This also can be done through short-cut keys like control x for cut. The functions available are useful only to those expert users of computers. From the scenario given above those talks about cutting files and folders, the noun is the target and the destination file while the verb is the movement or the process in making the process impossible. This involves also dialog boxes for conformations to the users that will help them to manipulate the action.


On the other hand, this event happens in every functional computer regardless of its brand and application; what's the difference is only how this computers react with what the user do.

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  oberorancismichael on Sat Mar 12, 2011 9:50 am

1. Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)


 As what I have understood of noun-verb guidelines, noun is the folder or the file that will be transfer to other destination and verb is the process made by the computer. As we all know users are the one that initiates and controls the process of the computer or the system not the computer. In this case noun-verb is manipulated by the user through computer and that is an interaction. It is called Noun-verb guideline because in a interaction between human and computer in file transferring we should first click or choose the file which would be the noun then followed by the process of transferring the file to the other destination in order to complete the whole process of transferring files.

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  merafehangad on Sat Mar 12, 2011 9:51 am

For these instances in the ‘noun-verb’ guidelines it can only suggest that we could assess us to all operations which will execute those actions like the verb in which acting as a one arguments like the noun. Such for the case of moving a file or shall we say copying files in this action it requires one or more arguments and the operation to move which requires to performed the user to select first the icon of the file which you are going to move or to copy, next after that is to indicate the copy operation indirectly by dragging the icon you have selected going to the destination folder you wish to move or copy the file. The noun there is the dialogue that file to be moved or to copy and the target folder and the verb is to move operation. To describe easily the operations it is the noun-verb-noun operation and in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we should first indicate both the folder and the target file before you must indicate the move operation.
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exercisenumberfour

Post  rancisolanobero on Sat Mar 12, 2011 1:41 pm

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder.

The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation.
That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

reference: http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/
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Exercise 4

Post  Nesscel Ann Marie Calara on Sat Mar 12, 2011 1:59 pm

I’m not so sure whether I have the right understanding on this question. But as of how I understand it, when we say 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, it is suggested that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action or the verb, acting with one argument or the noun. In the case of moving a file or copying, for that matter, the action move or copy requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun--verb--noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun--verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop.

But I haven’t got any experiences in using an Apple Computer or a Mac OS so I don’t really know if the information I have there is all true. But that is how I understand it though.

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  irelene cosicol on Sat Mar 12, 2011 2:10 pm

The noun--verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun--verb--noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun--verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.
The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun--verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialogue box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialogue is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialogue subscribes to neither the noun--verb or verb--noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.
reference: http://www.hcibook.com/hcibook/exercises/chapt5.html

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  tiffanycarabuena on Sat Mar 12, 2011 2:24 pm

i think most of the actions that will be made in the desktop by left clicking would violate the noun-verb agreement. the very action of left clicking is a verb... so cut, copy, send to, and more can violate this agreement.

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  Chad Festejo on Sat Mar 12, 2011 2:56 pm

The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation.

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Re: Exercise 4

Post  Allan S. Cabusora on Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:41 pm

The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location.

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exer 4

Post  irwin rod adesna on Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:57 pm

Base on what I have researched, yes, there are instances that the guidelines mentioned above is violated. The "noun-verb" guideline for operations used in computer interactions suggests that in every action executed inside the computer environment, there must be a pair of two entities called the noun - which serves as the object subject to be changed, moved, etc, and the verb, which specifies the action that must be completed to the object. A simple example of this is moving a file around the desktop. The noun is the file and the verb is the "cut" or "move to destination folder" command.

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EXERCISE4 DAW

Post  ikoymaster on Sat Mar 12, 2011 4:08 pm

No! I cant think of any instance that would violate the guidelines....

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Ass-Four

Post  vinceilagan on Sun Mar 13, 2011 4:07 am

Exercise 4 Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of action acting with one argument. In the case of moving a file (or copying for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user to first select the icon for the file to be moved and then indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released. The file moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is “move to destination folder.” Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialogue box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialogue is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialogue prescribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.(Taken in the internet this is the simple action of dragging and dropping things like in the desktop icons of what a user wants into his computer interface may look like another features of Human Computer Interaction much more on making ones side to his own things.)
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Exercise 4

Post  Godofredo C. Pisngot Jr. on Sun Mar 13, 2011 11:47 am

It is said that noun-verb guideline for operations doesn’t have consistency with the other operations. The example they have showed was with the copy, cut, move and paste action which was described as copy as the verb and the destination folder to be the noun. And with the sample showed it has been also said that searching a particular file via dialog search box neither follows the noun-verb nor the verb-noun guideline.

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Exercise 4

Post  Julie Ann R. Monteroso on Sun Mar 13, 2011 7:16 pm

HCI has a long tradition in capturing knowledge for driving the design and evaluation of interactive systems. One of the first approaches develop were design “guidelines”. Their purpose is to capture design knowledge into small rules, which can then be used when constructing or evaluating new user interfaces.

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

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from: Beverly L. Rabaja

Post  florenzie_palma on Tue Mar 15, 2011 1:45 am

From the Apple Human Interface Guidelines:
* Your application will be easier to document, because an intuitive interface and standard behaviors don’t require as much explanation.


The discussion of consistency suggested that it can take many forms, because it is usually referred to in relation to some other feature of the interaction between user and system. Mentioned already in the text we have consistency related to the following principles:


Familiarity - consistency with respect to prior real-world experience

Generalizability - consistency with respect to experience with the same system or set of applications on the same platform

In addition, we could interpret some other principles as contributors to consistency:

Affordance - consistency with understood intrinsic properties of an object, so a soft button on the screen should allow us to always 'push' on it to select some action

but take note of this one:



Predictability - consistency of system response with user's expectation, given the user has some information about past interaction history



Substitutivity - consistent permission from system to allow use of equivalent values for input and output

Commensurate effort - consistency of effort with respect to doing and undoing tasks

Response time stability - consistency of system response for similar actions

Some other principles for consistency from the text and elsewhere:

Consistency can be relative to the form of input/output expressions relative to the user's conceptual model of the system. An example in the text involves using keys whose relative positions are similar to commands for the systems (any set of four typewriter keys that form a diagonal to indicate up, down, left and right information for an input command).

As discussed in the exercise on colour, consistency can be with respect to social or cultural conventions (e.g., using red to indicate stop or hot, green for go, blue for cool).
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Exercise 4

Post  arnulfotaghoy on Tue Mar 15, 2011 4:50 pm

The noun--verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun--verb--noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun--verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun--verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialogue box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialogue is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialogue subscribes to neither the noun--verb or verb--noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

arnulfotaghoy

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Exercise 4

Post  Russel John L. Serrano on Tue Mar 15, 2011 7:29 pm

The 'noun-verb' guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder.

The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder.

The verb is the move operation.


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Re: Exercise 4

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