Exercise 4

Page 1 of 3 1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Exercise 4

Post  Admin on Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:25 pm

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

Admin
Admin

Posts : 12
Join date : 2010-11-19

View user profile http://danvirgelratilla.topicboards.com

Back to top Go down

Excercise 4

Post  george101_2007 on Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:25 pm

George Norman Patayon

From my understanding of what I read in the internet about the Apple Human Interface Guidelines, I think it only applies to Mac architecture computers. But when we talk about Windows computer, it would violate that guideline when we refresh our computers, since we are not selecting anything (noun) but what we do is all actions (verb). When we refresh our computer we click the right button of the mouse (verb) and we click again the refresh (verb). I am not sure of my answer because I am not so familiar with Mac architecture, but this is the violation that I see.

george101_2007

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

EXERCISE 4

Post  Xaviery Dwight Noval on Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:29 pm

Exercise 4

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

Reference:
http://www.hcibook.com/hcibook/downloads/pdf/exercises.pdf

Xaviery Dwight Noval

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-09

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  abigail_duhaylungsod on Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:24 pm

ANSWER:

In copying and moving files if we are about to copy the file the one we are going to choose is copy and while the file is being copied the word copying is being used and when it is done the choices for copying a file will go back to copy. So from noun-verb-noun again. The same thing works for moving. So far in my experiences in computer handling I haven’t encountered any problem about such. Base on my researches there are some that could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline because of the verb that is used in file moving which is 'move to destination folder'. I don’t really think there is this said violation because it still suits the action you are doing.

abigail_duhaylungsod

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

EXERCISES 4

Post  Jevelyn C. Labor on Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:43 pm

I was not really aware about the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface issue. Even my friends are not aware about it. So Mr. Google(as always) helped me in my problem. According to him, the noun--verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder.
I honestly don’t know what are the possible violations to be connected in the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface issue. But since the internet provided the exact answer, I take the opportunity to copy it. It says that the user control guideline utters that, 'The user, not the computer, begins and organizes all actions .' In the example of dialogue boxes, this principle is evidently opposed. A dialogue box can be utilized to designate when an error happens in the system. Once this error has been identified and presented to the user in the dialogue box, the only action that the system permits the user is to concede the error and discharge the dialogue box. The system blocks the user dialogue, with good explanation. The blocking nature of the dialogue box is to guarantee that the user really sees that there was an error. Most probably, the only errors that will be constructed in such a disturbing manner are ones which the user must know about before continuing, so the preemption is warranted. But sometimes dialogue boxes are not used to specify errors and they still avoid the user from executing some actions that they might otherwise desire to execute. The dialogue box might be asking the user to fill in some information to specify parameters for a command. If the user does not know what to provide, then they are stuck. A lot of the time, the user can find out the information by browsing through some other part of the system, but in order to do that they must exit the dialogue box (and forfeit any of the settings that they might have already entered), find out the missing information and begin again. This kind of preemption is not desirable. It is most likely this kind of preemption the user control principle is planned to avoid, but it doesn't always get useful.
avatar
Jevelyn C. Labor

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Mark Bryan B. Gonzales on Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:11 pm

Admin wrote:Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

The noun--verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun--verb--noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun--verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun--verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialogue box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialogue is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialogue subscribes to neither the noun--verb or verb--noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

reference: http://www.hcibook.com/hcibook/exercises/chapt5.html
avatar
Mark Bryan B. Gonzales

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Frenzess-Joy H. Elman on Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:23 pm

Exercise 4:

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

Base on what I have researched, yes, there are instances that the guidelines mentioned above is violated. The "noun-verb" guideline for operations used in computer interactions suggests that in every action executed inside the computer environment, there must be a pair of two entities called the noun - which serves as the object subject to be changed, moved, etc, and the verb, which specifies the action that must be completed to the object. A simple example of this is moving a file around the desktop. The noun is the file and the verb is the "cut" or "move to destination folder" command.

An example of a violation instance is the dialogue search box. We can say that the noun is the file that you have specified in the search box to be searched for and the action is the clicking of the "go" button of hitting "enter" in the keyboard. But that is really not the case. The operation is dependent to the set of keywords that you have entered in the search box. There are many combinations of these keywords that can be generated, so we can say that the "noun-verb" principle does not really apply to this scenario, because it lacks consistency. The principle applied to this can be considered dynamic or flexible.
avatar
Frenzess-Joy H. Elman

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-10
Age : 25
Location : Bajada, Davao City

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  chamz_perez on Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:36 pm

Admin wrote:Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)




The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released. The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

reference: http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/
avatar
chamz_perez

Posts : 10
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Gwapong_Tao_Edward_Baylon on Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:52 pm

It would be violated if it will be changed according to the will of the user. Honestly I really don’t know how this ‘noun-verb’ guidelines work or what really is this all about.(LOL ^_^)

Gwapong_Tao_Edward_Baylon

Posts : 6
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Eric N. Papas

Post  ericpapasit on Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:02 pm

Yes, because as to know the benefits from violating the Apple human guideline approach we would argue that it will not be sufficient to reconfigure its features one at a time. I believe that an integrated design that builds a new user interface from the bottom up will be more usable and will have a better goal for increasing user productivity.It will likely have to be based on deeper object architectures that supports network-distributed distribution and detailed attributes that are sufficiently standardized to be shared among multiple functionality. As moving files around on the Desktop will be more easy and functional as other non-apple os. Very Happy
avatar
ericpapasit

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-01-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

exewrcise 4

Post  juvilyn consejo on Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:04 pm

When we say 'noun-verb' guideline for operations it is suggested that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action or the verb, acting with one argument or the noun. In the case of moving a file or copying, for that matter, the action move or copy requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun--verb--noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun--verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop.

It violates the guidelines because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialogue box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation or the search parameters and the folders or volumes to search.
avatar
juvilyn consejo

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-01-11
Age : 26
Location : tagum city

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Ruchan Alangilan on Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:08 pm

Arrow The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

Arrow The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/

Ruchan Alangilan

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  jonalyn sanchez on Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:12 pm

As to what I have read, it is said that noun-verb guideline for operations doesn’t have consistency with the other operations. The example they have showed was with the copy, cut, move and paste action which was described as copy as the verb and the destination folder to be the noun. And with the sample showed it has been also said that searching a particular file via dialog search box neither follows the noun-verb nor the verb-noun guideline.

jonalyn sanchez

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Exercise 4

Post  frozenfreak7 on Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:15 pm

Ralph Gideon B. Doron

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

from: http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/


Last edited by frozenfreak7 on Thu Apr 07, 2011 1:41 pm; edited 1 time in total

frozenfreak7

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Ma. Monique Asuque on Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:18 pm

I can’t really tell if there could be any violation since I haven’t used an Apple computer, but if we are going to set Windows an example, there is a violation happening. On a normal event happening on a computer, noun-verb guideline is not used but instead the noun-verb-noun guideline is. For example is file transfer or file copying, we go to the original location where the file is located (noun), then we do right click and choose whether we want to copy or cut (verb), after that we will go to another location where we want to place the file (noun).
avatar
Ma. Monique Asuque

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-09

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  jennifer conta on Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:38 pm

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.
avatar
jennifer conta

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-09
Age : 26
Location : Davao City

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Exer 4

Post  Mary Claire P. Avila on Fri Mar 11, 2011 10:27 pm

As I have understood a noun-verb guideline implies that the operations to be performed by the user are composed of an action which is the verb which acts with one argument which is the noun. Let us consider the case of moving or copying a file the action must have more than one argument. An example to this statement is to move files around on the Desktop. In this process before the move operation is performed the user must first select the icon for the file to be moved and then to choose the move operation by dragging the selected icon to where its destination folder is. In this case the nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation.

In this kind of condition the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated through the command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Normally, this is defined by some dialogue box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation which is the search parameters and the folders or volumes to search. This kind of form-filling dialogue subscribes to neither the noun--verb or verb--noun guideline, the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.
avatar
Mary Claire P. Avila

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11
Age : 26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

exercise 4

Post  Allan Gregor Gepulla on Fri Mar 11, 2011 10:31 pm

Basically, everything we do in the interface involves doing action to an object. For instance, the CRUD: create, read, update, delete. At least one of those cores of the interaction of objects is needed to do something in our desktop. Even copy and paste involves it. A simple reload page involves it. The startup still involves it.
So, I got no arguments with Apple.

Allan Gregor Gepulla

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Exercise5

Post  April Kaye Bestre Bigonte on Fri Mar 11, 2011 10:40 pm

Charmagne Christal Billuga---sir dli jud q kasulod


Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)


it was suggested that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent. thats what just i have read from this site(http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/)
avatar
April Kaye Bestre Bigonte

Posts : 8
Join date : 2010-12-01
Age : 26
Location : Obrero, Davao City

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Alaina Simbal on Fri Mar 11, 2011 10:41 pm

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

source: http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/

Alaina Simbal

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Jovanne Nick L. Cacayan on Fri Mar 11, 2011 10:57 pm

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

The file-moving example is a slightly contrived one, because some could argue that there is no violation of the noun-verb guideline (hence, moving is still consistent with respect to input expression) because the verb is 'move to destination folder'. Perhaps a better example is a command to search a file system for files matching some specification. Here, the action is to do the qualified search and the argument or noun is the set of folders or volumes of the system that you want searched. Typically, this kind of operation is defined by some dialog box that allows the user to indicate in any order the specifics of the operation (the search parameters) and the folders or volumes to search. Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This kind of form-filling dialog subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline; the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.

Jovanne Nick L. Cacayan

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Exercise 4

Post  boogie on Fri Mar 11, 2011 11:01 pm

Melchor S. Inte Jr.

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

The noun-verb guideline suggests that we can view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (the verb) acting with one argument (the noun). In the case of moving a file (or copying, for that matter), the action (move or copy) requires more than one argument. The way the move operation is performed requires the user first to select the icon for the file to be moved and then to indicate the move operation implicitly by dragging the selected icon to the destination folder. The nouns in this dialogue are the file to be moved and the destination folder. The verb is the move operation. The natural way to express this is in the order noun-verb-noun. Strictly speaking, in order to stick with the noun-verb guideline, we would have to indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation. That would be consistent, relative to input expression, with most other commands on the desktop. However, some principles of direct manipulation and familiarity to the user are more important. Moving files by dragging them on the desktop is very similar to the way we can pick up any object in the physical world and move it to its new location. And the dragging operation is incremental and easily recoverable; moving to one place can be undone within the same operation since the dragging can continue until the file is released.

from: http://www.hcibook.com/e3/exercises/ex7/
avatar
boogie

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11
Age : 26
Location : Davao City

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Exercise 4

Post  Dianne Jean Dumdum on Fri Mar 11, 2011 11:03 pm

• “…the order is more flexible for the user than consistent.”

It is better to define first what a ‘noun-verb’ guideline operation is. As it is being defined that a ‘noun-verb’ guideline let us know that we are able to view all operations that the user will perform as being composed of an action (verb) acting with one argument (which is the noun). As our personal experience, we had already followed this guideline and the very much common of which is the copying a file. In moving a file the act of moving or copying (which is the action) requires more than one argument. In the case of moving a file, operations performed requires the user to select first the file to be moved as well as the location folder in which it is to be relocated. After which is the command saying to move or copy this file to other location. This time the nouns are both the file to be moved and the destination folder while the verb is the move operation. This time since we already followed the noun-verb guideline we can conclude that in order to stick with this guideline we must first indicate both the target file and the destination folder before indicating the move operation.
Now being asked to suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides the consistency of ‘noun-verb’ guideline, we would try to recommend one. Seeing a single point of view, we can directly say that nothing is arguable in the first guideline. It seems like the principles are consistent enough to be followed. With the concrete facts from the internet, other abstract form of principles had already been discovered and suggested. One of which is the filling-form dialog. It refers to a database system which is being filled by the user indicating any order specifics of the operation. (Assuming that it is the file search system who will utilized the database dialog). Once this unordered dialog is complete, the user then indicates that it is OK for the system to perform the operation. This means that it subscribes to neither the noun-verb or verb-noun guideline.

Dianne Jean Dumdum

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Exercise 4

Post  dudzcomz on Fri Mar 11, 2011 11:08 pm

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)

The Apple human computer is really good because the user will learn quickly and accomplish their tasks quickly. It is really a big advantage to the user who are made to practice this kind of device. As I read the guidelines, the apple human computer would not be violated because as far as i can see the software that they is so very capable and durable.

dudzcomz

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Phoebe Angelie Gallardo on Fri Mar 11, 2011 11:24 pm

Can you think of any instances in which the 'noun-verb' guideline for operations, as suggested in the Apple human interface guidelines for the Desktop Interface, would be violated? Suggest other abstract guidelines or principles besides consistency which support your example. (Hint: Think about moving files around on the Desktop.)


As far as I know, I don’t think of any instances in which the noun-verb guidelines for operations would be violated because English is dynamic. Many words nowadays are invented and technology has it’s own language and meaning. I think technology should not always stick to the rules of the English language because it has its own meaning.
avatar
Phoebe Angelie Gallardo

Posts : 5
Join date : 2011-03-08

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Exercise 4

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 3 1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum